CBC News: Horizon: Zero Dawn and the evolution of the video game heroine

Montreal-based developer Brie Code cites The Colonel's Bequest, a point-and-click adventure game designed by Roberta Williams and released in 1988, as the reason she got into games as a career.

The game stars Laura Bow, a college student and amateur detective investigating a Clue-like murder case in southern Louisiana. Code describes Bow as "a quiet but strong and inquisitive smart young woman."

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Mercedes-Benz Magazine: Game Changer

Code has been circling the globe since late 2015, after leaving her position at industry heavyweight Ubisoft, where she worked on major action-adventure titles for seven years. While her original plan was to rent out her Montreal apartment and purchase an open-ended airplane ticket, she scaled her strategy back a bit – but not much – to attend international video-game conferences, with occasional stops home to unpack and reconnect with friends. So far this year, the self-described workaholic has been to Austin, Beirut, Berlin, Istanbul and Stockholm, to name a few.

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The Guardian: From Overwatch to Firewatch: the best video games of 2016 - chosen by developers

Brie Code (Tru Luv Media)
Known for: Child of Light, Assassin’s Creed series
Working on: #selfcare
My choice is Quadrilateral Cowboy. More than any other game this year, Quadrilateral Cowboy surprised and delighted me. It did so on many levels – the storytelling was of course fantastic, and the gameplay played with convention, and there were just so many lovely little unexpected details. Must play.

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The Guardian: Five lessons that video games could learn from television drama

Earlier this month, game designer and programmer Brie Code wrote an interesting opinion piece for GamesIndustry.Biz. Entitled “video games are boring”, the article questioned pretty much all our assumptions about what games are, how they work and what they can do. Her argument was that a huge number of people are locked out of playing games because of age-old conventions, mechanics and assumptions.

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Kotaku: This Week In The Business: No Country For Kool-Aid Men

QUOTE | “There’s a psychological effect where an individual in a group of similar people will have fewer good ideas than the same individual in a diverse group. If there is any workforce full of people who are similar to each other, it is the video game industry workforce. We are mostly men, mostly white, and even more importantly, we are mostly gamers. Could it possibly be that maybe, just maybe, we could be missing something?” - Tru Luv Media founder and former Ubisoft lead programmer Brie Code, suggesting reasons why video games are in a creative rut.

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Kill Screen: A New Studio Where People Who Don't Like Videogames Make Videogames

Montreal-based programmer Brie Code has set up a new studio called Tru Luv Mediathat aims to make videogames with the help of people who don’t like videogames. The reason being that she wants her friends and people like them to care about games. These are people for who videogames do not resonate at all, mostly because they draw from the same cultural references time and again, use the same design principles, and are primarily made for people who already play videogames—there’s nothing there for anyone else.

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Huffington Post: How Women Will Save Gaming

"The change I've seen in the community over the last year is that more and more women are sharing their stories and creating connections and building supportive networks. A year ago I could only speak in hushed whispers about some of the more egregious incidents of sexism in my career for fear of loss of allies and influence, and now I can use them as examples in talks at schools and conferences to hundreds of people and build connections across the industry. 

"There is a greater awareness of the underlying causes of the lack of diversity in the tech and games industries and with that they can start to be addressed. It won't be an easy road and it is not fixed yet."

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Brie Code
DeanBeat: A big brain dump on video games in Montreal

Brie Code worked for many years at Ubisoft Montreal, managing programming teams on games such as Child of Light, Assassin’s Creed III, Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, and Assassin’s Creed II. She was often on teams where she was the only woman or just the oddball in the group.

“It’s sad for me,” she said. “It’s also sad for the industry itself."

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